Power of the Tongue with Clinical Examples

This post is all about the power of the tongue

Today I will leverage on my Clinical background to explain some fascinating facts about the power of the tongue.

Ready? Let’s go…

What does the Bible say?

The Bible is clear about the power of the tongue. Proverbs 18:21 (MEV) says, “Death and life are in the power of the tongue, and those who love it will eat its fruit.” The tongue has incredible power- both for good and bad.

When it comes to the power of the tongue, some people are quick to write it off as superstition. However, there is actually clinical evidence that suggests otherwise.

In this post, I will discuss what the power of the tongue means. I will also go over a couple of clinical studies that back this up. I will also discuss the benefits of using the tongue for good and how it can transform our lives.

So, what does the power of the tongue actually mean? It can either build someone up or tear them down. We see this in how we use our words. When we speak words of encouragement to someone, it can lift their spirits and make them feel better. On the other hand, speaking words of negativity and hurt can do the opposite. This is why it’s so important to be careful with our words and to use them wisely.

Historical Examples

Throughout history, there have been many examples of the power of the tongue. One example comes from Charles Spurgeon, a famous preacher in the 1800s. He tells the story of a shoemaker who, during the great cholera plague, wrote Psalm 91:19 on his window. This verse says, “He shall call upon me, and I will answer him; I will be with him in trouble; I will deliver him and honor him.” As a result of this man’s faith, he was spared from the disease while everyone around him died. This just goes to show that our words really do have power- both for good and for bad.

One example comes from a study conducted in Japan. In this study, researchers took two groups of rice plants and spoke different words to them. One group was spoken to with kind words like “you are doing great,” while the other group was spoken to with mean words like “you’re worthless.” The researchers then looked at the plants after 30 days and found that the plants that were spoken to with kind words had better growth than the plants that were spoken to with mean words.

Again, these examples show that the power of the tongue is not just a superstition.

Why highlight studies

Words are not just words. I love to highlight clinical studies because it almost always points directly to the word of God, especially when it is done with integrity and without bias. These studies directly show us the power and authority we have as human beings. We also understand the weight of our words according to scripture.

As Christians, knowing that we understand the depth of our words, we should be both challenged and encouraged since we know the truth. We have something that can even defy what is deemed logical- it’s called faith. Although we don’t have a scientific study that measures faith and its transformative nature, we shouldn’t brush it off. Again, clinical studies are eons behind when it comes to unearthing certain things that have been unlocked by Christians spiritually- through the sword of the spirit, which is the word of God. It also shows us not to be blind to only focus on what is physical. There is indeed a spiritual realm that we are affected by; even if one chooses to be blind to it, it does exist!

Clinical Studies

In 1999, Japanese scientist Dr. Masaru Emoto conducted a study on the power of words on water. He froze water samples and then observed them under a microscope. He found that the frozen crystals were beautiful when he said positive words to the water. However, when he said negative words to the water, the frozen crystals were ugly. This study showed that words have a physical effect on matter.

Clinical studies have also shown the power of words. A study by Dr. Madan Kataria found that when people laugh, their body releases neuropeptides that help fight stress and boost the immune system. Another study by Dr. David Hamilton found that kind words can change the expression of genes that are linked to stress and immunity.

The benefits of using positive words are clear. When we use positive words, we are not only affecting water molecules, but we are also positively impacting our own health. By using the power of the tongue for good, we can transform our lives and the world around us.

The study, titled “The Effects of Positive Self-Statements on Psychological Stress and Physical Health,” was conducted by Alia J. Crudu and published in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine in 2009. The study found that people who meditated on positive, affirming statements had lower levels of stress and anxiety and higher levels of happiness and well-being. The participants in the study were divided into two groups. One group was given a list of positive, affirming statements to meditate on, such as “I am loved,” “I am doing my best,” and “I am worthy of good things.” The other group was given a list of neutral statements to meditate on, such as “The sun is shining” and “I am breathing in and out.”

Crudu’s study is just one of many that suggest that the tongue has a powerful influence on our psychological and physical health. After eight weeks, the participants who had meditated on the positive, affirming statements reported feeling significantly better than those who had meditated on the neutral statements. They had lower levels of stress and anxiety and higher levels of happiness and well-being.

Dr. Kristin Neff conducted another study over the course of eight weeks. During this time, the participants were asked to complete various tasks that measured their self-compassion, such as a written exercise in which they had to imagine themselves failing at something important. The results showed that those who spoke kindly to themselves were more likely to achieve their goals than those who didn’t.

This study provides strong evidence for the power of the tongue. When we speak kindly to ourselves, we are more likely to achieve our goals. This is because speaking kindly to ourselves boosts our self-compassion, which in turn gives us the motivation and resilience needed to pursue our goals.

These findings suggest that there is power in the words we say to ourselves. When we speak kindly to ourselves, it can positively impact our mental health. So, the next time you’re feeling stressed or down, try speaking some positive words to yourself. It just might make a difference.

Conclusion

As Christians, this post confirms what we already know- God’s word is alive and active. It penetrates our hearts and minds, and it has the power to change us. (Hebrews 4:12) Not only is His word alive, but it will never come back void. (Isaiah 55:11)

In as much as we need to be careful with our words, it’s rather comforting to know that when we put our trust in God, His word will always prevail. No matter what circumstances we face in life, we can know for sure that God’s promises will stand.

So, what are some benefits of using the tongue for good? When we use our words to build others up, we are not only making them feel better, but we are also improving our own mental and emotional health. In addition, speaking words of encouragement can help us reach our goals. Studies have shown that people who speak kindly to themselves are more likely to achieve their goals than those who don’t. This is because speaking kindly to ourselves gives us the motivation and confidence we need to succeed.

So what does all this mean for us? It means that we need to be careful with our words. We should use them wisely because they have the power to build someone up or tear them down. It also means that we should use our words for good because when we do, we are not only helping others, but we are also helping ourselves. When we use our words to encourage and motivate ourselves, we are more likely to achieve our goals.

So, let’s start using the power of the tongue for good today!

Hugs!

12 thoughts on “Power of the Tongue with Clinical Examples”

  1. Heather, I have been having a bout of depression (again). Today I was taking a walk and praying. Not sure where to begin. I started saying this is the day that the Lord has made; I will rejoice and be glad in it. Your post is just a confirmation for me that I need to keep up the positive talk.
    Thank you.

    Reply
    • Hello Kate! Thank you so much for dropping by and for sharing. I believe this was a divine post for you because I wasn’t planning to post this at all but went ahead to do so. God loves you so much and I know that the word of God will never come back void. Sending hearts and hugs your way Kate. You are in my prayers. ❤️

      Reply
  2. We live in a word-framed world. Whatever you say has the power to create. Many people have become victims of careless thoughts and utterances more than anything else. Your mouth is your destiny molder.

    Reply
    • Hello Chris! Thanks for stopping by. I like the way you framed it!! Amazing! The mouth is genuinely one’s destiny molder, per what you stated. Thanks for sharing this deep insight,

      Reply
  3. The power of words- as I study James and reading your post, it adds to the relevance words have.
    Thank you Heather for sharing this. It just reminded me to be more careful with how I use my words.

    Reply
    • Amen Manu! Thank you so much; I appreciate your consistent support. I need to do much better with staying connected here on the blogosphere. You mean a lot to me as a blogger friend. I hope to improve. Lots going on with me– juggling new beginnings with family and stuff. Hugs and hearts. P.S still waiting on your book, and I will order 10 copies. xoxo

      Reply
      • Aww thanks so much Heather. You are a dear blogger friend too. You inspired and encouraged me when I had but a few followers. Life can get busy for us all but we are not to abandon a friend when they are busy and may not be able to be so giving of their time during those seasons. I try to understand and extend that grace.
        With regards to my book- I have not started on that yet. I find myself stretched for time too. In addition my son in his final year of school so it is a little stressful and I find that mentally I do not have much room to delve into writing my first book. So I decided to wait on it a bit longer so I can give it my all.
        May the lord be with you as you handle things on your end with family and other things.

      • Thank you so much, Manu! I appreciate the grace you are extending to me. I totally understand the being stretched part! Final year can be hectic. I’m here to support you in any way. Blessings to you and yours!

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